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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
in with no preparation at all, when president kennedy's legislative program, civil rights and every one of his other major bills as well was stalled by the southern committee chairman who controlled congress as they had been controlling it for a quarter of the century, to see him get the program up and running, ramming it through to what lyndon johnson do that in the first weeks after kennedy's assassination is a lesson in what a president can do if he now knows all of the levers to pull, but has the will, lyndon johnson's case, almost vicious drive to do it to win, to say over and over again as i am always saying to myself when i am doing the research, look what he is doing here. i don't say i succeeded but i try to explain that in my books and to me, to see him do that is something that is not only fascinating but revelatory, giving a true insight into how power works in washington and there's another reason that i don't get tired of doing these books of lyndon johnson. you are always learning something new and that goes even if what you are researching is something that has been written about 1,0
that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 19641965. he opposed martial -- in 1964 and 1965. he oppose richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time. he got lucky. issues that result on civil rights -- you got resolved on civil rights. senator byrd that's on the leadership ladder and he rises -- gets on the leadership ladder and he rises. he becomes the with in a stealth campaign. -- whip in a stealth campaign. the idea of robert byrd as leader goes from being inconceivable to virtually inevitable. he has earned his way up to be leader. at the beginning of my book, he becomes leader and replaces mike mansfield, who is sort of an icon. can replaces byrd mike mansfield. but the truth is, no one thought that mike mansfield could replace lyndon johnson. that is certain the way things work. as my book starts, the first chapter is about byrd. it is entitled "the grind." he is a hard-working
time in the most dramatic, possible way. we hear the confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life and death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office. that this tonight as we continue through the holiday on c-span2. >> the west virginia state society honored senator robert byrd last month. the longest living senator in history, robert died in -- robert byrd died in 2010. we will hear from two of his staffers. >> the first speaker is ira shapiro. author of "the last great senate." he played important roles in foreign intelligence surveillance and the completing of the metrorail system. during the clinton administration, he served as a leading u.s. trader and earned the rank of staffman. -- ambassador. he was described as an antidote and he promised to deliver. he practiced international trade law and washington. on behalf of the west virginia state society, i would like to introduce ira shapiro. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for the kind introduction. thank you to the s
are not hatch in three days. it would take three long weeks for those eggs to hatch. the civil rights movement taught me patience. never give up, never to give in, to never give up, but to always keep your eyes on the prize. so across the bridge is about patients, about how, truth, love and reconciliation. now when i was growing up in rural alabama and was visiting a town of troy, visiting montgomery, visited tuskegee and later as a student in nashville, tennessee and made a living in atlanta. i saw the sign said white men, colored women, colored rating, white waiting. as a child my mother, father, grandparents said that's the way it is. don't get in the way, don't get in trouble. but in 1855 at the age of 15, i heard of rosa parks. i heard of martin luther king junior. in 1957 at the age of 17 i never said parks. the next year at the age of 18, i meant to her martin luther king junior. the action of rosa parks, people in my camera and leadership of dr. king inspired me to get in the way, to get in trouble. for more than 50 years have been getting in trouble, good chabot, necessary travel. [ap
know, having protests from southerners who were unhappy about the civil rights. we had people who were unhappy about the war. i told chuck, i said, you to the easy way out. [laughter] you went to vietnam in 1968. when you think, all of you -- just think what happened in 1968, if you are born and then, it was a year from hell. i mean, we had the north koreans captured one of our ships. we had washington burning. you know, it was just awful. but lucinda robb was born. so that was something good about the year. >> susan, on a different scale, your father has been vindicated by history for pardoning richard nixon, but at the time there was a lot of popular blowback. overnight, his approval ratings fell from i think the 70% to below 50% certainly. what was your perspective from that time about -- did you encounter people who would mention their displeasure at that point to you? >> i did. even though i was on the third floor, my room was on the same side of the white house as hers was, and i heard the demonstrators, too. you cannot believe how thick the windows are at the white house but you
, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before the wedding of victoria will, george's only daughter. george was standing on the edge of the hotel ballroom taking and one of life's great moments. the marriage of the daughter is so deeply emotional. george the loving father was clearly caught up in a moment. that was the moment i seized the opportunity to strike. i sidled up to him and whispered ever so softly in his ear,
of the campaign civil rights division. in that capacity, leading a campaign, he convinced kennedy to telephone caruthers scott king in the matter of his imprisonment on the trumped up charges. it was a risky move given the residual racism that still tainted american life. but many analysts had concluded that the phone call attracted enough african-american votes to the democratic party that your to win a razor-thin victory to john kennedy. after the inauguration, president kennedy asked shriver to assume leadership as the founding director of the peace corps. when asked why he had selected his brother in law for the job, kennedy said that if the project were to become a flop, it would be easier to fire a member of the family when a political ally. when we look at the origins of the peace corps today we have to be careful not to read history backwards or to argue that the success of the peace corps was inevitable. it wasn't so in 1961. deep in the cold war, many thoughtful people were skeptical putting their reputation and presence of the united states in underdeveloped countries into the hands
about civil-rights. the second part of your question, how did he get kennedy -- it takes a lot of pages in this book to talk about all the things he does but the thing he does on the instant, this bill appears to be totally dead. he says didn't someone file a discharge petition? discharge petition had been filed -- this bill was in a committee that was never going to let it out. wasn't even the senate. still in the house rules committee which was shared by judge howard w. smith and would even give a date. the bill was going nowhere. johnson remembers someone filed a discharge petition to take away from that committee. that was -- a discharge petition ever -- never passed. violation of house rules and no president had ever gotten behind one before. johnson calls the representative who introduces it and representative of missouri has been told by the leaders dropped this thing and listen to johnson in this telephone call to see a genius in human nature because the first half of the call, we can't violate the house precedents. then up next on booktv after words with this guest host richard
for granted, three great civil rights laws, medicare, just the vibrancy in those tapes, all you have to do is listen and he's back alive again swearing and being the most fascinating person that i've ever met in public life. and the books are helping because they create this giant character. he deserves it. >> and giant situations in front of him the way he came in as well as the way he left. >> a giant character and also -- >> dark clouds. >> you were there closely with him, but also so complicated. our relationships with our presidents are so personal, and the fact is he accomplished remarkable things politically. and yet you never get through a couple of pages of carol's books where you go, ew, this was not a good guy. >> i don't think -- that's not true. i disagree that he's not a good guy. he's a strange guy. >> they're all strange. >> there are not many presidents that take you into the bathroom and talk to you while they're in the bathroom. >> not enough. >> there's not many presidents that when he talks to you violates the normal human space between people so your head is right up
was rising in all of that, and the civil rights movement and she exposed us to lot. but i was just a junkie. the time i was 9 years old, i was handing leaflets out for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party headquarters and was handing out leaflets on the street corner in new york'. some women thought this was really cute, this little boy and leaflets. and she asked me why. and i made the case and got in early start in my political career. she said this is for you and she hands this box of pastries. i took a back to the liberal headquarters and we opened it up and there were all of these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics -- the district leader grabbed the money and said you can keep the doughnuts. [laughter] >> you and the friend sold bumper stickers for robert kennedy. >> yes. >> and buttons and other things. >> for those of us who lived through it and remember, that was a time of great turmoil, but a
and the work of the civil rights activist in the 1960s. and thomas mann and norm ornstein on their book of partisanship in congress. >> the tension builds in one of the things that happens during that time is that a soviet submarine is found by american ships. and there are charges on a soviet submarine. a knock out the electrical system. the carbon dioxide is rising. people are passing out inside the submarine. they have no communication with the commander. the commander loads the torpedo, the war started already in the war is starting. they want to launch the nuclear torpedo. fortunately, one of the other commanders on the ship from a lower rank talked him out of it. it might have saved the world. >> of this is so close to the edge. it really was one of the scariest moments after this. >> they said we didn't notice. honestly, we were teenagers. my god, we wouldn't even be here to talk. >> director oliver stone and peter koznick of the untold history of united states senator nunn on 10:00 p.m. eastern on booktv's "after words." part of four days of nonfiction authors and books through
way. we hear the tense confrontations of the civil rights movement and the life-or- death decisions being made during the cuban missile crisis. >> caroline kennedy joins "listening in" editor ted widmer in a discussion on the 1962 recordings of the late president in the oval office, tuesday evening at 7:00, as "book tv" continues through the holiday on c-span2. >> i was 9 and i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. when i was 10, i made a big decision and broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay, who was running for mayor of new york. i went down to the liberal party. [laughter] i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york. and a woman thought this was really cute, this little boy handing out leaflets. she asked me why, and i made the case for lindsey. got an early start on my political consulting career. i made the case against his opponent as well. [laughter] she said, "that's so cute." she said, "this is for you." she hands me a box of what looked to be pastries, a white box with string. i took it back to the liberal party headquarters
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)